If you are unhappy with a Law Society decision about your complaint or if you think the Law Society's process was unfair, you have options.

You may be able to seek a review of the decision by the Law Society's Complainants' Review Committee or, if you think the process was unfair, you can seek assistance from the Office of the Ombudsperson.

Complainants' Review Committee

The mandate of the Complainants' Review Committee is to review the files of individuals who are dissatisfied with the dismissal of their complaints following a review by the Law Society staff .

Not all complaint dismissals have an automatic right of review. The Complainants’ Review Committee will not consider a review of complaints that are outside the jurisdiction of the Law Society, are frivolous or an abuse of process or don’t allege facts that would constitute a discipline violation.

To initiate a review, you must complete the request form and send it back to the Law Society to the attention of the Complainants' Review Committee within 30 days after the assigned lawyer’s assessment was communicated to you.

To apply for a review, download and print the request form and information sheet . Fill the request form out manually and submit it to the Law Society by email, postal mail or fax.

To submit the request by email, scan the completed form and email it to professionalconduct@lsbc.org.

To submit the completed request form by Canada Post or courier, send it to the following address:

  • Attention: Complainants’ Review Committee
  • Professional Conduct
  • Law Society of British Columbia
  • 845 Cambie Street
  • Vancouver, British Columbia V6B 4Z9

To submit the completed form by fax, send it to 604.605.5399.

When the committee has completed its review and enquiries, the committee can confirm the decision to take no further action, refer the complaint to the Discipline Committee or refer the matter to the Practice Standards Committee.

Office of the Ombudsperson

If you feel the Law Society's process was unfair you can also contact the Office of the Ombudsperson, an independent body that handles complaints about provincial public authorities.